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Mmm...Goat

Not a lot of food-blogging on this site, but since Dan Drezner mentioned it, it seems worth noting that goat is not only healthy and popular with immigrants, it's delicious, too. Though, sadly, I must admit that I don't know any goat recipes, I've only picked it up at various Outer Boroughs eatiers during my NYC days. Certainly, it's a preferable alternative to the starvation diet popular in some of the city's other wards. Based on my DC experiences, though, I think I need to take issue with the Tribune's contention that "If you want to know who eats goat, it's anybody but white people, descendants of Northern Europe" as the District's plentiful Salvadoran restaurants don't appear to serve any goat.

November 30, 2004 | Permalink

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Comments

You can get good goat curry at the Islander on U street right near where you live, Matt. The coconut cake is also incredible if they have it.

Posted by: flip | Nov 30, 2004 3:48:38 PM

" as the District's plentiful Salvadoran restaurants don't appear to serve any goat"

However, I have seen it on the menu at some of LA's plentiful Salvadoran restaurants, and certainly in lots of other Latin American restaurants. There is a really great Mexican goat stew that is made with avocado leaves and spices, and several Mexican restaurants devoted almost solely to plates of roasted goat and cold beer. I keep meaning to get to these places, although it's hard since my wife can't eat goat. Where I really haven't ever seen goat used is in Southeast Asian food (Thai, Malay, Indonesian, Korean, etc.)

If you're looking for ways to cook goat, I would recommend modifying lamb recipes. I think any recipe for lamb stew or roasted lamb would work pretty well with goat, although you'd have to be more careful about not letting the meat get dried out because it's leaner.

Posted by: MattT | Nov 30, 2004 3:48:50 PM

Curried goat is delicious. Since you're talking about outer borough cooking, Matt, have you ever been to Uncle George's Greek Tavern in Astoria? They serve grilled goat's head in which they roast the skull, cleave it in two and everybody reaches in to pull out and sample the cranial giblets.

Of course the really adventurous try the kokoretsi . . .

Posted by: Randy Paul | Nov 30, 2004 4:00:56 PM

Cube one goat.
Marinate in yogurt for one day.
Saute 2 diced onions and 4 cloves of minced garlic in 4 tablespoons of butter over low heat.
Add goat.
Cook, stirring frequently, over medium heat for 6 minutes.
Discard, order pizza and serve.

Posted by: Njorl | Nov 30, 2004 4:34:30 PM

I had goat this past weekend. It is excellent. And reputadly (meaning, my mother says so) it is easier to digest than cow meat. Cow meat is good for ground beef and kebabs -- goat is the rich man's food.

Perhaps the lack of goat at your local restaurants is a supply issue? I would eat a lot more goat if it was available at the supermarket.

So why hasn't goat caught on more in the USA? Why does most European cuisine give the goat short shrift? Unlike Ostrich or Emu, it's a mainstream meat derived from an animal that is native to Europe and easy to raise.

Posted by: Ikram | Nov 30, 2004 4:35:11 PM

Yes, I agree whole-heartedly with the above recommendations for goat curry. When I spent a few months climbing in Pakistan, it was the only fresh meat available. The porters would slaughter a goat halal-style and we'd have fresh goat curry within minutes. MMMmmm. (The only issue was watching the goat - which had been led up the mountains for days - killed in such a bloody style, but that's my "blue state" sensibilities, I suppose.)

Posted by: Al | Nov 30, 2004 4:36:35 PM

Are Italians white? They certainly eat goat (capretta, i.e., kid, turns up regularly on menus here).

Posted by: Vance Maverick | Nov 30, 2004 4:47:41 PM

Yes, I agree whole-heartedly with the above recommendations for goat curry. When I spent a few months climbing in Pakistan, it was the only fresh meat available.


I also spent some time in Pakistan--sampling hash, rather than rock climbing--and can say tbetterhat goat goes with the dry, Paki/Afghani take on South Asian cooking perfectly. (As opposed to the creamier, somewhat sweeter Indian cuisine, where I think goat doesn't work quite as well.)

I also enjoy the bemused/horrified look of people responding to my claim that goat simply kicks ass in terms of flavor.

Goats, however, do not tend to be meaty animals. It's almost like a whole beast composed entirely of neck-bone. But the flavor, combined with those dry, hot curries, simply can't be beat.

Posted by: bobo brooks | Nov 30, 2004 5:08:20 PM

"As opposed to the creamier, somewhat sweeter Indian cuisine, where I think goat doesn't work quite as well."

I don't think I agree with this. I had once had a Goan goat curry, with a pretty rich, creamy coconut base, and it was outstanding.

Posted by: MattT | Nov 30, 2004 5:17:21 PM

Fair enough. Goat still kicks much butt, particularly in spicy applications. Ooh, that reminds me--jerk goat is about 30 times better than jerk chicken.

Posted by: bobo brooks | Nov 30, 2004 5:26:15 PM

Interesting that everyone else commenting likes it. I was served goat for the first time recently in the home of Tibetan immigrants and found it entirely ghastly and vile-tasting.

Posted by: Flora | Nov 30, 2004 6:05:56 PM

MattT, goat most certainly is found in Indonesian food (and probably Malaysian too, which is very similar). I had some decent goat curry (aka kambing) in Yogyakarta this summer.

Posted by: BW | Nov 30, 2004 6:21:11 PM

Fricasé de cabrito

Posted by: Gabriel | Nov 30, 2004 6:50:01 PM

According to this, goat isn't all that new.

Posted by: praktike | Nov 30, 2004 7:40:43 PM

Actually, you can get curried goat on the UES, from sidewalk vendors, who specialize in Jamaican cuisine. There's one on 71st and York, a block from Sotheby's, where the "starvation diet" is very popular.

Posted by: sofia | Nov 30, 2004 9:22:04 PM

hey matt, you should go to Negril in Silver Spring. it's a famous Jamaican place with killer goat curry. 965 Thayer Ave. worth a trip.

Posted by: belle waring | Nov 30, 2004 9:26:38 PM

There's a "My Pet Goat" joke buried in there somewhere.

Posted by: theogon | Nov 30, 2004 9:36:06 PM

Every Greek Easter me and the wife head to Eastern PA to visit her relatives. While lamb on a spit is customary for that holiday, sometimes the Greeks roast both a lamb and a goat. Invariably the goat tastes better.

Funny story: since I learned ancient Greek first, my modern Greek is accidentally chock full of vocabulary words which are either quaint or incomprehensible to my wife's family. One Easter I wanted to say something about the goat on the spit so I kept on calling it "tragos", which is the ancient word for goat, until one of my cousins stopped laughing long enough to tell me that the word now meant "dirty old man"...

Posted by: oodja | Nov 30, 2004 11:04:55 PM

Matt, try Ethiopian cuisine. There used to be a great place on 13th(I think)called Auxum. If not then there's a couple places in Adams Morgan.

Posted by: pablo | Dec 1, 2004 1:51:23 AM

The Goldilocks Filipino restaurant & bakery chain has Kalderetang Kambing, goat stew in a spicy tomato sauce with olives. Yum.

Posted by: TomB | Dec 1, 2004 3:15:59 AM

There used to be a great place on 13th(I think)called Auxum. If not then there's a couple places in Adams Morgan.

Including Meskerem, my pick for the best Ethiopean in the city.

Posted by: Steve | Dec 1, 2004 3:12:34 PM

I've eaten goat only once, cooked by my brother who is a superb chef (and for years a professional) but had never before made goat. It was terrible. It may be that there are ways to make it tasty, but I wouldn't recommend amateurs trying.

Posted by: Alex | Dec 1, 2004 3:52:40 PM

I've had boiled goat in the mountainous Zagori region of northern Greece - a little like Irish Stew, I suppose - and roast goat on more than one occasion. Goats, being sure-footed and omnivorous, are almost the only edible animal that can survive in many areas.

Tasted like lamb but less fatty and more savoury.

Posted by: Thomas Dent | Dec 1, 2004 7:01:27 PM

Goat is, of course, the meat of choice among West Africans, esp. Nigerians. I'm not aware of any Nigerian places in DC, although there are a few in the Outer Boroughs of New York City. For good goat Egusi & Pepper Soups (the National Dishes of Nigeria) in Chicago, in descending order of prefence:

Caato Restaurant
7118 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60626
773-465-6255

Bolat African Cuisine
3346 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL
773-665-1100

B&Q Afro Root Cuisine
4802 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60640
773-878-7489

Posted by: John Beadle | Dec 3, 2004 2:25:03 PM

goat cheese pizza with spiced minced roasted goat meat basil and sundried tomatoes is the Mexican way to go Italian. Pizza con chevo aparillado.

Posted by: Joe Fuentes | Feb 25, 2006 10:47:27 AM

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