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Of Cold And Super Bowls

Steve Clemons really doesn't know his football if he thinks the Super Bowl involves "big guys chasing a ball in the cold." The game is invariably played in some warm weather site, oftentimes under a dome. It's rather pathetic. Real playoff football -- to wit: big guys chasing a ball in the cold -- comes to an end with the Conference Championships as we saw in January. If I had my way about it, we would change the Super Bowl rules to require the big game to be always located in the most frigid environments possible. Green Bay! Foxboro! If they would just un-dome whatever the stadium in Minneapolis is called, that would be awesome. Sure, the ticket-holders wouldn't be so thrilled, but we're talking about a group of people who have tickets to the Super Bowl and they hardly need our pity. For my part, I'll be hanging with my separated-at-birth twin. I'm sure Steve's C-SPAN gigs are really interesting, though....

February 6, 2005 | Permalink

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Comments

Next year they will be playing in toasty Detroit. Unfortunately, Ford Field has a dome.

Posted by: matt wilbert | Feb 6, 2005 12:51:49 PM

Come on Matt! You have to know the Vikings play in the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome! What other foootball team plays in a stadium named for a Democrat?

Posted by: Zoidberg | Feb 6, 2005 12:52:15 PM

Unfortunately, the HHH Metrodome doesn't have a drainage system adequate for the amount of water that it would collect, so taking the roof off would basically turn it into a cesspool.

Gone are the days when the Purple People Eaters would chew up lesser teams on the tundra. I wish I had been there to see it. Now it's just a stinking megamall.

Posted by: Erik Mitchell | Feb 6, 2005 12:58:28 PM

Ralph Wilson Stadium, Orchard Park? Buffalo anyone?

Now that would be a kick butt Superbowl

Posted by: Ono | Feb 6, 2005 1:12:10 PM

Unfortunately, Ford Field has a dome.

As an ex-resident of Detroit, it is too bad the entire city doesn't have a dome over it.

When the Superbowl came to Pontiac in the 80s, it was amusing to watch the city, which was a dilapidated shithole, try and open temproary restaurants and night clubs, etc.... Most of the guests partied in their hotels rather than face the cold and makeshifts offerings. (I was there) It took a full decade before anything permanent actually took hold in Pontiac during the '90s.

In Detroit proper, the Woodward corridor will likely be ablaze a year from now, but god-forbid the Superbowl revelers should venture just a single block outside of the "green zone". The abject poverty and desolation of a formerly proud city would astound them.

Posted by: def | Feb 6, 2005 1:44:03 PM

That guy really doesn't look musch like Matt, particularly with Matt's new lumberjack-like beard . . .

Posted by: rea | Feb 6, 2005 1:56:41 PM

A stinking megamall? Your bitterness is risible.

I think the problem with FDR is that he saved the rich from the tumbrels. But even so, the Mall of America is a wonder of the world. I bet even Karl would like it,lol.

Posted by: Michael7843853 | Feb 6, 2005 1:58:41 PM

I used to live in Minneapolis as well. The metro dome was fine for football, but watching the Twins indoors really sucked.

Posted by: def | Feb 6, 2005 2:09:41 PM

Nothing could be farther from the gladiator spirit of contemporary football than the stoicism conveyed by frozen-tundra settings like Lambeau Field. Pro football is about excess, not renunciation. Bad weather inhibits the passing game, and with it both the spectacular pass plays and the bone-crushing hits (mostly made by safeties and middle linebackers, not linemen) that are the signature moments of the game.

Jacksonville is a bad deal, though; it's a literal sacrilege to hold the supreme American ritual in towns with no greater distinction than to have built a colosseum at public expense. The right places to hold the
Super Bowl are warm-weather party towns: SoCal, New Orleans, Miami, and (if non-NFL towns are allowed) Las Vegas.

Posted by: ktheintz | Feb 6, 2005 2:15:45 PM

Mud is good too. SF-Dallas 1994 (or 1995?).

Posted by: John Isbell | Feb 6, 2005 2:17:30 PM

Come on Matt! You have to know the Vikings play in the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome! What other foootball team plays in a stadium named for a Democrat?

The Washington Redskins.

Posted by: mark | Feb 6, 2005 3:08:26 PM

FedEx Field is named after a Democrat?

Posted by: Rambuncle | Feb 6, 2005 3:24:24 PM

The game is invariably played in some warm weather site, oftentimes under a dome. It's rather pathetic. ... If I had my way about it, we would change the Super Bowl rules to require the big game to be always located in the most frigid environments possible. Green Bay! Foxboro!

Temperature right now, according to weather.com:

Green Bay: 41 degrees
Foxboro: 46 degrees
Jacksonville: 65 degrees

Reality-based, Matthew?

Posted by: Al | Feb 6, 2005 3:27:12 PM

Right...Green Bay and Foxboro are both much colder than Jacksonville. It's hardly my fault that the whole country is experiencing freakishly warm weather (welcome, except for the Super Bowl aspect) this February. I've long been a proponent of global warming, however.

Posted by: Matthew Yglesias | Feb 6, 2005 3:35:19 PM

Of all the comments I've made, he picks THIS ONE to actually wade into his comment section and respond to. Sheesh. :-)

Posted by: Al | Feb 6, 2005 3:44:19 PM

Ralph Wilson Stadium, Orchard Park? Buffalo anyone?

Now that would be a kick butt Superbowl

Not today, it wouldn't. We're in the 50s here, snow's melting all over, and I went for a walk without a jacket earlier. Buffalo's winter weather is worse in December and early January, actually -- after Lake Erie freezes over, the snow pretty much stops entirely.

Posted by: Jaquandor | Feb 6, 2005 4:42:22 PM

In Detroit proper, the Woodward corridor will likely be ablaze a year from now, but god-forbid the Superbowl revelers should venture just a single block outside of the "green zone". The abject poverty and desolation of a formerly proud city would astound them.

No shit. Downtown Motown really is the hellhole that GOPers like to paint urban areas in general as.

I used to live in Minneapolis as well. The metro dome was fine for football, but watching the Twins indoors really sucked.

Especially if you were a Tiger fan in October of 1987.


Posted by: Wally Ballou | Feb 6, 2005 4:53:15 PM

Aw, Motown ain't so bad. I can remember going to the Bronx in the 1980s as a young one and there were burned out cars on the expressway. I haven't seen that any of the times I've been to Detroit. Although the area around Tiger Stadium was like "The Crow." Woodward is hilarious though, driving down it, the ghetto noticably starts just as you cross some railroad tracks. It's a classic.

Ford Field having a dome is not just a travesty to tradition and all that's good and right, (speaking as one who played high school football into November in Upper Michigan) it's one to good sense.

Take a gander at the NFC North (Minnesota, Green Bay, Chicago, Green Bay) Now spot the dome teams.
Hint: They're also the ones who've never won a Super Bowl and the ones who haven't even been to one since they started playing on carpet.

Plus, what better way to sell luxury boxes than the promise of heated comfort in Detroit in January?

Dan

Posted by: Dan | Feb 7, 2005 9:48:08 AM

I can remember going to the Bronx in the 1980s as a young one and there were burned out cars on the expressway. I haven't seen that any of the times I've been to Detroit.

The burned out cars on the freeway in Detroit are taken care of by wrecker drivers who are paid a bounty by the city. The city in turn sends a bill to owner of the cars. I received a $200 for towing + $40/day notice when my car was stolen.

As for the Bronx, people still live there. In Detroit they've been running for decades. And seriously, the next time you go, drive east-west along some of the side streets just north of Ford Field and south of Wayne State University. You will want to cry.

Posted by: def | Feb 7, 2005 10:34:01 AM

Go Argonauts!

Posted by: Ian Knox | Feb 7, 2005 2:47:15 PM

Yeah, probably over-flippant about amount of neglect and misery on display around that city, I just instinctly leap to Detroit's defense, living here in Kalamazoo. I did wander around that area a bit two(?) years ago, when the stadium was still being built. Not good.

Come next year's super bowl, I'm guessing Detroit's going to get trashed to the nth degree by every scribe on earth.

Dan

Posted by: Dan | Feb 7, 2005 5:18:44 PM

I know the NFL always picks either a warm-weather site or a dome, (left to me, it would always be in N'Awlins, where they really know how to party -- and this year Mardi Gras is right after the Super Bowl) ) but it can't just be coincidence that you never see any Super Bowl team in its home stadium. Do the NFL poo-bahs factor in the likelihood that a proposed site will house a plausible Super Bowl contender? And if so, how have they managed to do such a great job?

Posted by: C.J.Colucci | Feb 8, 2005 2:15:59 PM

"Come on Matt! You have to know the Vikings play in the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome! What other foootball team plays in a stadium named for a Democrat?"

I'll bet Curly Lambeau was a Democrat.

Posted by: R Anderson | Feb 9, 2005 4:14:45 AM

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